Lund Community Society

9654 Larson Road

PO Box 202

Lund, BC  V0N 2G0

lundcommunity@gmail.com

Each of these Barnacles holds a little treasure in the form of stories about our beautiful community. Read through them, year after year, to learn the secrets of Lund - past and present.

Have a read of the Barnacle through the years!

2006

October
July
April 
January
 

2005 

October
July

April 

January
 

2004 

October
July 
 

2003 

Summer
Winter
 

2002 

Summer
Spring
 

2001 

Spring
 

2000 

Winter

September

August

May

April

March



 



 

 

1989 

Fall
Summer

February
 

1988 

Fall

Summer

THE HISTORY OF THE BARNACLE ONLINE

 

In 2014, an idea was tossed around by Teedie Kagume, of the Powell River Historical Museum, and Sandy Dunlop, current editor of the Barnacle, to have the  Museum digitize all of the back issues from the newspaper’s debut in summer 1988. This idea blossomed into approval by the Lund Community Society to apply for a matching funds grant to the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library. In February of 2015, we learned we had been awarded the grant.

 

Finding a copy of all of the Barnacles was challenging; finding uncrumpled copies without coffee rings, pen doodles, and half-completed crosswords was even more so. Under each volunteer editor and staff, the paper had a different publishing schedule, so we may never know if the issues we could not find were ever even printed. So Lund! What follows are the issues we did find, and being able to save them from moths and to share them online is very satisfying.

 

Many thanks to:

 

  • The Powell River Historical Museum, especially Teedie Kzume, Bert Finnamore, and Doug Mobley

  • The Irving K. Barber Learning Centre at UBC Library

  • The Lund Community Society and its volunteers, especially Sandy Dunlop for initiating the project, Margaret Leitner for writing the grant, and Wendy Drummond for managing technology.

 

THE HISTORY OF THE LUND BARNACLE

 

One day in the early summer of 1988, a crowd formed on the Lund dock to see the 11’6” 300+lb six- gilled mud shark that had been recently caught. Among the gawkers were Bill Smith and Claire Heffernan, who took a photo of it. Bill said, “we should have a newspaper here where we could put stuff like this”. Claire agreed, and the Lund News soon hit the stands. It was on 12 pages of 11”x14” newsprint, hand typed with headings in calligraphy. Besides the photo of the shark, there were articles from the Lund School, the
Waterworks, the Regional Board, to name just a few. There was an interview with Claire and her passionate exposé on fish farming, and there was a contest to name the paper. Bill was the editor. It was free.

 

The next issue came out in the Fall of 1988, sold for fifty cents, and had a name, “The Lund Barnacle”, with the assurance “(will grow on you)” written below. Dan Mooney had come up with over fifty names and Bill chose that one. Claire says she may still have that list somewhere. Dan won a $50 gift certificate from Percy’s fish plant which they redeemed in prawns.

 

For the next ten years, to the summer of 1998, twenty issues in all, Bill was the editor or a contributor, along with many others: Jo Suche, Donna Huber, the entire Keays family, Anne Cameron, Siobhan James, Gordon Ellison, and more. The Barnacle in those years was full of interesting controversy, fun, news and reviews. It had some great covers and artwork by Keith Matheson, good photos of locals and local scenes, and lots of consciousness-raising articles on our threatened environment. In the winter of 1991 it went to $1.00, and from that point on, it was 28 pages fat and rich with community.

 

In April 1999, Valerie Durnin took over the editorial reins. The paper stayed newsprint, but increased in size to 11”x17” and came out with twelve pages close to once a month up to the winter of 2000/01, fourteen issues in all. That time period led up to the millenium, and Val researched museum archives and did an historical chronology and excellent interviews with some of Lund’s elders, accompanied by great old photos. There were interviews with younger folks too, asking for a look into the future of Lund. Len Ryan, Cor Landman, and Val contributed great photos of our beautiful surroundings and of our villagers enjoying the many events of the day. This was also the period during which the Hotel was sold, completely renovated, and grandly reopened. The Lund School closed and reopened in another form. Lots of things to write about! Regular contributors included Camille Davidson, Ted Durnin, Suzan Roos, Donna Huber, Margaret Ducharme, and Saundra Olsen, with three dozen others too many to name here.

 

Valerie now says the challenges of her job : “...were greatly overshadowed by the wonderful stories about the endlessly interesting people of Lund, and the incredible things the small and lively community gets done.”

 

From time to time there were no Barnacles published because there were no volunteers willing to take it on.

 

In the spring of 2002, Suzan Roos and Rianne Matz became editors and the Barnacle came out in a new size, 81⁄2” x11”, photocopied at the Lund Barnacle Community Centre on regular paper, sixteen pages, and sold for $2.00. Suzan and Rianne put out a year’s worth of issues, joined by Katrin Harry for the last issue. They had nice artwork (Rianne) and photos and contributions by three dozen Lundies during that time.

 

The next editor was Ann Snow, who began in July 2004 and published four issues a year, sixteen pages each, for the next six years, up to April 2010. Ann’s

photography was particularly sharp and clear, and she added colour starting in 2008. The number of contributors during that time is about fifty. Ann also added quite a bit of filler from the internet in the form of spoofs, jokes, and cartoons.

 

Eve Stegenga took over in July of 2010 for the next eight issues to summer 2013. There were about twenty contributors over that time. This brings us up to the present, 2014, when in January, I became editor. In researching this article, I managed to track down and read nearly all of these Barnacles. It was fascinating and I am truly humbled by the quality of what precedes me.

 

In the words of Bill Smith, “Go Barnacle!”

Sandy Dunlop, current editor of the Barnacle, in beautiful downtown Lund holding the astoundingly successful community paper! Reader Feedback: "WOW! The Barnacle is beautiful, informative, interesting, and fun!" Drewen Young "The Barnacle makes me feel like a part of a wonderfully authentic community! Thank you." Kirsten Clarkson